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REGIONAL NETWORK ANALYSIS SITUATING LOST VALLEY IN THE INTER-SITE LANDSCAPE


A Thesis Presented to the Faculty of San Diego State University


In Partial Fullfillmenf of the Requirements for the Degree Master of Arts in Anthropology


by

Victoria Lynn Kline

Spring 2009

 


SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY

The Undersigned Faculty Committee Approves the Thesis of Victoria Lynn Kline:

 

Regional Network Analysis Situating Lost Valley in the Inter-Site Landscape

 

Lynn H. Gamble, Chair
Department of Anthropology

Larry L. Leach
Department of Anthropology

Ming-Hsiang Tsou
Department of Geography

Approval Date: March 18, 2009

 

Copyright © 2009
by
Victoria Lynn Kline
All Rights Reserved

 


 

DEDICATION

To my father, Richard McCall Hannah, a physician and master of the liberal arts who loved books and indulged himself frequently.

 


 

ABSTRACT OF THE THESIS

Regional Network Analysis Situating Lost Valley in the Inter-Site Landscape by Victoria Lynn Kline Master of Arts in Anthropology San Diego State University, 2009 The purpose of this study is to analyze possible contact pathways through Lost Valley, San Diego County, California, using the methods of least-cost path analysis for both real and modeled travel corridors through the San Luis Rey Watershed. I conducted this study using ArcView 9.2 GIS (geographic information systems), digital elevation models, and aerial photography in order to show the most likely corridors of travel and trade using least-cost path modeling. In addition, I compared the modeled paths to real trail networks, for example those that show up in aerial photographs and/or those written about in the literature. This study demonstrates how prehistoric and protohistoric peoples traveled through the Lost Valley area and how contact networks were likely established and maintained. The modeled travel corridors are compared to the ethnographic and historic knowledge of the Cupeño who seasonally occupied Lost Valley.

 


 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER

1 Introduction

2 Background

3 Literature Review

4 Methods

5 Results and Discussion

6 Conclusion

REFERENCES

APPENDIX

LIST OF TABLES

LIST OF FIGURES

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

For better printout, and page numbering that matches the printed version at the SDSU Library, pdf files for the thesis are below. Right click the link, then Save As:

1 Introduction

2 Background

3 Literature Review

4 Methods

5 Results and Discussion

6 Conclusion

REFERENCES

APPENDIX

Front Matter that includes TOC, List of Tables, List of Figures, Acknowledgements, and Abstract

 

Complete Thesis in pdf (3 MB)